Tips on Getting Your Driver’s License

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Tips on Getting Your Driver’s License

Hand holds a driver license. Indification card photo ID. Vector illustration in flat style isolated on white background

Hand holds a driver license. Indification card photo ID. Vector illustration in flat style isolated on white background

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Hand holds a driver license. Indification card photo ID. Vector illustration in flat style isolated on white background

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Hand holds a driver license. Indification card photo ID. Vector illustration in flat style isolated on white background

Rebecca Tao, Staff Writer

Being able to drive is one of the first steps into adulthood and becoming more independent. At the age of 16, you can apply for a driver’s license with provisional instruction, but at 18 you are free to apply for a license without driver’s ed. While this process may at first seem like a daunting and convoluted task, it can be simplified down to these steps:

  1. Driver’s Ed Course
    • Driver’s Ed was a course at AHS but it has since been retracted. However, these courses are easy to find and are readily available nearby. You have to be at least 15 to enroll in such courses, and you can find them online. Once you gather your Certificate of Completion, you are one step closer to hitting the road.
  2. Learner’s Permit: Knowledge and Vision Testing
    • The knowledge test is based entirely on the California Driver Handbook. The test is multiple choice with three options per question. While there are multiple resources that offer free practice tests online, in the off-chance that you do not pass, you will be required to begin the process again if you fail three times. If you fail the written exam, you must wait one week before taking it again. For the vision test, a wall letter chart test is done to measure if it meets the standard of 20/40. If your eyes exceed 20/70, the DMV will refer you to a specialist to ensure your ability to drive.
  3. Behind-the-Wheel Instruction
    • With your driving instructor, you need to complete a set amount of practice hours, which is 50 hours in California. The DMV website suggests that “It will take more than 15 minutes of practice time every day for six months to complete 50 hours of practice driving, of which at least 10 hours must be night driving practice.” Sophomore Lawrence Sung said, “You can go to a driving school or be instructed by parents.” In driving school, there are two sets of pedals and brakes. After you get the 50 hours, the instructor will sign off on your permit.
  4. Driving Test, Paperwork, and Application
    • It is recommended to practice on multiple types of terrain and conditions to get an understanding of what to expect. During the driving test, an instructor will evaluate your ability to drive and score you based on skill, obedience of traffic laws, and parking.

In the end, this long process is worth it. In the future, driving will come as second-nature and it will feel more natural after practice. So, what are you waiting for? Go to the DMV today and apply for a license!